Publications

Newsletter July 2022: The unresolved Conflicts from Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine

 

Dear colleagues,

As part of the “The unresolved conflicts from Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine. A common EaP and EU vision for reconciliation and confidence-building across the region” project, we are delighted to present you our fourth Newsletter.

See the full version at the link.

The content of the Newsletter is the sole responsibility of the ESGA Association and does not necessarily reflect its partners’ views.

“The project benefits from support through the EaP Civil Society Forum Re-granting Scheme (FSTP)to Members and is funded by the European Union as part of its support to civil society in the region. Within its Re-granting Scheme, the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum (EaP CSF) supports projects of its members that contribute to achieving the mission and objectives of the Forum. 

Grants are available for CSOs from the Eastern Partnership and EU countries. Key areas of support are democracy and human rights, economic integration, environment and energy, contacts between people, social and labour policies.”

 

Newsletter May 2022: The unresolved Conflicts from Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine

 

Dear colleagues,

As part of the “The unresolved conflicts from Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine. A common EaP and EU vision for reconciliation and confidence-building across the region” project, we are delighted to present you our third Newsletter.

See the full version at the link.

The content of the Newsletter is the sole responsibility of the ESGA Association and does not necessarily reflect its partners’ views.

“The project benefits from support through the EaP Civil Society Forum Re-granting Scheme (FSTP)to Members and is funded by the European Union as part of its support to civil society in the region. Within its Re-granting Scheme, the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum (EaP CSF) supports projects of its members that contribute to achieving the mission and objectives of the Forum. 

Grants are available for CSOs from the Eastern Partnership and EU countries. Key areas of support are democracy and human rights, economic integration, environment and energy, contacts between people, social and labour policies.”

 

Newsletter March 2022: The unresolved Conflicts from Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine

 

Dear colleagues,

As part of the “The unresolved conflicts from Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine. A common EaP and EU vision for reconciliation and confidence-building across the region” project, we are delighted to present you our second Newsletter.

See the full version at the link.

The content of the Newsletter is the sole responsibility of the ESGA Association and does not necessarily reflect its partners’ views.

“The project benefits from support through the EaP Civil Society Forum Re-granting Scheme (FSTP)to Members and is funded by the European Union as part of its support to civil society in the region. Within its Re-granting Scheme, the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum (EaP CSF) supports projects of its members that contribute to achieving the mission and objectives of the Forum. 

Grants are available for CSOs from the Eastern Partnership and EU countries. Key areas of support are democracy and human rights, economic integration, environment and energy, contacts between people, social and labour policies.”

 

Newsletter January 2022: The unresolved conflicts from Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine

 

Dear colleagues,

As part of the “The unresolved conflicts from Georgia, the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine. A common EaP and EU vision for reconciliation and confidence-building across the region” project, we are delighted to present you our first Newsletter.

See the full version at the link.

The content of the Newsletter is the sole responsibility of the ESGA Association and does not necessarily reflect its partners’ views.

 

“The project benefits from support through the EaP Civil Society Forum Re-granting Scheme (FSTP)to Members and is funded by the European Union as part of its support to civil society in the region. Within its Re-granting Scheme, the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum (EaP CSF) supports projects of its members that contribute to achieving the mission and objectives of the Forum. 

Grants are available for CSOs from the Eastern Partnership and EU countries. Key areas of support are democracy and human rights, economic integration, environment and energy, contacts between people, social and labour policies.”

 

Policy Paper: The Civil Society`s Response to the Coronavirus Pandemic in the Central-South-Eastern Europe and South Caucasus

 

This policy brief is based on a succinct analysis of the impact of the new Coronavirus pandemic on the internal capacities of the civil society to act and deliver common goods for the target groups. This analysis identifies some national and regional particularities during this pandemic and the impact on public policy consumers.

The ESGA research also seeks to identify the mixed-methods approach of the civil society to combat the threats from the authorities, but also the disinformation and social terrorism campaigns.

Policy Brief PDF

Authors: Angela Grămadă, Cătălin-Gabriel Done

This policy paper is elaborated within the project ”Protecting democratic values by tackling pandemic-related disinformation”, implemented by the Center for Policy Studies, Armenia, implemented in cooperation with the Experts for Security and Global Affairs Association, Romania, and the Latvian Institute of International Affairs, Latvia, with the support of the Black Sea Trust for Regional Cooperation, a project of the German Marshall Fund of the United States. Opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of the Black Sea Trust or its partners.

For more information about the Project findings please visit CENTRE FOR POLICY STUDIES, Armenia, web page

 

Policy Paper: Main trends in disinformation in the COVID-19 era. Study cases: the Republic of Moldova and Romania

 

This policy paper aims to identify the main topics of misinformation in the Republic of Moldova and Romania, which formed the basis of a broad campaign to manipulate public interests and promote political or economic interests. The research offers the opportunity to deepen thematic analysis at a later stage. Also, an important stage in the elaboration of this analysis is the identification of the main actors that promote fake news to obtain more benefits, which distort, modify or influence the behavior of the public opinion.

The document starts from the hypothesis that although most of the themes and topics for the disinformation campaigns promoted in the two neighboring states seem to intersect or coincide, there are also particularities that require different approaches.

Deepening the issues of misinformation and their subsequent analysis will not only help to identify trends in manipulating public opinion by promoting deliberately distorted messages by different actors but will offer a platform to identify solutions or recommendations to support internal resilience to external propaganda or of misinformation for political purposes.

Policy Paper PDF

Authors: Angela Grămadă, Cătălin-Gabriel Done

This policy paper is elaborated within the project ”Protecting democratic values by tackling pandemic-related disinformation”, implemented by the Center for Policy Studies, Armenia, in implemented in cooperation with the Experts for Security and Global Affairs Association, Romania, and the Latvian Institute of International Affairs, Latvia, with the support of the Black Sea Trust for Regional Cooperation, a project of the German Marshall Fund of the United States. Opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of the Black Sea Trust or its partners.

For more information about the Project findings please visit CENTRE FOR POLICY STUDIES, Armenia, web page

 

Country Report: The Romania and Ukraine Bilateral Agenda

 

The bilateral dialogue between Romania and Ukraine is a complex one. This feature is generated by the multitude of different interests that the two neighboring states have established over time. Often, the definition of these interests has set the ground for complicated situations, difficult to be appreciated, accepted and solved by the political actors.

Between January – July 2019 the Association of Experts for Security and Global Affairs in partnership with the Foreign Policy Council “Ukrainian PRISM”, supported by the Black Sea Trust for Regional Cooperation, a project of the German Marshall Fund, has implemented the project ”The Romanian – Ukrainian Civil Society Forum for Dialogue and Cooperation”. Within this project we had as a aim to revive the dialogue between Romanian and Ukrainian experts at civil society level, by resuming bilateral meetings in bilateral or trilateral format (extended to the Republic of Moldova), to advocate through government initiatives in solving problems, to propose a set of recommendations and solutions to encourage the transition to a new stage in the bilateral dialogue between Bucharest and Kyiv, in which the stereotypes no longer have control over the content.

In the following, we propose to reflect with us on the most important challenges, but also opportunities at the same time, for the bilateral dialogue between Kyiv and Bucharest from the Romanian perspective. The Ukrainian perspective on bilateral dialogue will be published soon.

Country Report: ”The Romania and Ukraine Bilateral Agenda. Perspectives for a Roadmap on Security and Defence Sector and Economic Cooperation”.

This country report is elaborated within the project ”The Romanian – Ukrainian Civil Society Forum for Dialogue and Cooperation”, implemented by Experts for Security and Global Affairs Association, Romania and it is supported by the Black Sea Trust for Regional Cooperation, a project of the German Marshall Fund. All the views and opinions belong to the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the ESGA Partners.

 

Project Paper EaPTTF2018: A New Security Agenda for EaP. The Regional Approach

 

The Experts for Security and Global Affairs Association, as leading organization in partnership with  the Institute for European Policies and Reforms (IPRE), the Georgian Institute for Strategic Studies (GISS) and New Europe Center (former Institute of World Policy (IWP)), organized between November 14 – 16, 2018 in Bucharest, Romania, the second edition of the Eastern Partnership Think Tank Forum dedicated to ”A New Security Agenda for EaP. The Regional Approach”.

The event is part of the project the project EaP Think Tank Forum 2018 – A New Security Agenda for EaP, The Regional Approach, implemented in cooperation with the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum (EaP CSF), funded by the European Union from the EaP CSF re-Granting Scheme 2018.

The Bucharest edition of the Forum was held under the auspices of the Austrian Presidency of the EU Council and benefited from the support of the Central University Library ”Carol I”, the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and co-financed by Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS).

The overall aim of the project was to contribute to the strengthening of policy and advocacy capacities of the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum think tank network – to propose a comprehensive vision over the EaP security agenda, in light of EaP 2020 Deliverables.

Prior to this year’s edition of the EaPTTF, a group of well-known experts have prepared a comprehensive policy paper of the EaP security sector that includes also a set of recommendations to feed in the debates on the implementation of the EU Global Security Strategy in the context of the EaP 2020 deliverables and agenda for the next term of the European Commission (2020-2024). The paper and the recommendations were discussed during the EaPTTF edition in Bucharest.

We would like to get into your attention the policy paper A new security agenda for the Eastern Partnership: Assessing the key security risks for the EU, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine”, which will be promoted to the EaP and EU governments during 2019.

The authors underline multiple perspectives for analyzing the security challenges of their home countries from both national, with emphasis on domestic problems, and regional challenges that are highlighting the external threats and vulnerabilities. All these challenges require a common, systemic approach in each of the three countries – Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine.

By including a chapter dedicated to Romania in this paper, the project implementation team wanted to argue that a member country of the European Union also needs resilient institutions and firm decisions from the authorities in this regard. Changes to which the region is currently undergoing requires a comprehensive, comparative and responsible analysis of new vulnerabilities and threats.

The recommendations proposed by the authors are also organized in two directions of action: national – for their own governments and international – for the European Union.

Project partners will continue to monitor public policies, will continue advocacy measures at national and international level, and will ask for consistency in security decision making.

We wish you a pleasant and useful reading, and we look forward to meeting you on the social media pages of our project partners to continue our collaboration and debate future joint initiatives.

The Policy Paper: ”A new security agenda for the Eastern Partnership: Assessing the key security risks for the EU, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine”

Photos of the Event: EaPTTF2018 Edition

 

 

Study: Association agreements between the EU and Moldova, Georgia and Ukraine

Source: Kamil Calus, Facebook
 

On August 30, 2018, our colleague, Kamil Całus, from the Centre for Eastern Studies (OSW) in Warsaw, presented in Bruxelles at the reunion of the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs (AFET) the briefing paper dedicated to the implementation of the Association Agreement and DCFTA between European Union and the Republic of Moldova, elaborated in cooperation with Dr Angela Gramada from the Security and Global Affairs Association (ESGA) in Bucharest, and Dr Piotr Oleksy from University of Poznań. The policy briefing was elaborated between March-May, 2018, before organizing and invalidating the election results for the Chisinau City Hall. The authors’ recommendations and conclusions did not refer to these events.

The analysis also includes a policy briefing of the implementation of the Association Agreement between the EU and Georgia, written by Dr Nona Mikhalidze from the Istituto Affari Internazionali, and a policy briefing of the implementation of the Association Agreement between the EU and Ukraine was written by Dr Andriy Tyushka from the College of Europe (Natolin campus).

The full text of the study can be found here:

Association agreements between the EU and Moldova, Georgia and Ukraine. European Implementation Assessment

The presentations of the three reports can be found here:

 Committee on Foreign Affairs, European Parliament

 

History:

“In August, 2017 the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs (AFET) was requested to draw up three own-initiative reports on the implementation of the EU association agreements with Moldova (2017/2281(INI)), Georgia (2017/2282(INI)) and Ukraine (2017/2283(INI)). Petras Auštrevičius (ALDE, Lithuania) was appointed the rapporteur on Moldova. Andrejs Mamikins (S&D, Latvia) was appointed the rapporteur on Georgia. Michael Gahler (EPP, Germany) was appointed the rapporteur on Ukraine. This European Implementation Assessment (EIA) has been prepared to accompany the scrutiny work of the AFET committee and its implementation reports.”(Source: European Parliament Think Tank)

 

Policy paper: Presidential elections in Russian Federation: a competition without competitors

 

In the Russian Federation, electoral ballots are organized as a “celebration of democracy”. On March 18, 2018, the Russian Federation held presidential elections. Eight candidates met with the voters in front of the ballot boxes. Did they succeed or not to make a demonstration of the pluralism of the political opinion in Russia and how honest was the public debate? Have the necessary premises been provided for a fair and balanced fight between opponents? What were the candidates’ theses and projects presented properly? How did they define the future and how did they relate to the recent past? Identifying answers to these questions, which can easily be transformed into research assumptions, could offer those interested in policies promoted by Moscow some insights into the content of the future political decisions of the Kremlin. The objective of this study is to make a more analytical take-off in the content of electoral platforms, the strategies adopted by the candidates, and the platforms they were willing to assess the legitimacy of the “celebration” of democracy during an election in Russia in 2018.

This paper was realized by Dr. Angela Gramada within the project “Understanding the Eastern Neighborhood. A unique platform for comprehensive debates and analysis on Russian affairs” and it is part of the series of the follow-up events and analysis continuing the project implemented in 2017 by ESGA. Within this project, ESGA aims to engage the young generation of experts proactively in the efforts oriented on setting a new agenda for the dialogue with Russia and to encourage the participation in public debates.

Russian presidential elections PDF Version